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EuropaColon Italia is now on the Web!


Our Member group EuropaColon Italia is now on the Web!

Visit their website: www.europacolon.it

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Hours of TV Raises Risk of CRC in Young People


Sitting and watching TV and other sedentary behavior for more than two hours a day significantly increases the risk of contracting colorectal cancer among people under the age of 50.

According to the Nurses’ Health Study II of nearly 90,000 American nurses aged 25 to 42 when recruited for the study and followed up for two decades.

The risk is not increased by just sitting at the dinner table or reading a book, but by sedentary time resulting from passive media consumption on TV and the social media and the lack of vigorous physical activity.

Sedentary behavior, according to the study, involves the development of several chronic health outcomes, including cancer of the colon and rectum, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular. The very large, long-term prospective study was conducted by researchers at Harvard University in Massachusetts and and Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Missouri. It was published in the Cancer Spectrum of the Journal of the [US] National Cancer Institute.

The researchers said that although rates of colorectal cancer in the older US population – as well as in parts of Europe and Asia – has decreased in recent years due to colonoscopy screening and better diet, they have “increased dramatically in those ages 20 to 49 in the US.

In younger people, this type of often-fatal cancer is typically diagnosed at a more advanced stage and with more aggressive tumors. As a result, the American Cancer Society now advises that people who have no family or personal history of the malignancy should be screened from the age of 45 instead of 50, which was the previous policy.

The nurses were asked to complete questionnaires at baseline and again every two years. The questionnaires included questions about their medical condition and health, physical data such as a body mass index and lifestyle-related risk factors or prevention, such as smoking, physical activity, diet, and overall caloric intake.

In addition, the participants were asked to list in the questionnaires information and data about their behavior, such as standing or walking around the house or in the workplace, and especially watching TV, measured in the range of seven to 14 hours per week (one or two hours a day). During follow-up of 22 years during, 118 nurses developed colorectal cancer before the age of 50. Associated with an increased risk factor for illness were prolonged TV viewing and video content viewing on social networks.

The researchers found that sighted television had an increased and dramatic effect on the risk of colorectal cancer in women under the age of 50. The conclusion was particularly pronounced among women who participated in the study and were overweight and obese who had little physical activity and had a history of smoking.

The researchers found that one to two hours of daily TV or video watching on the computer was associated with a 12-percent increase in the risk of colon cancer compared to women who watched less than an hour of the day. The risk of getting sick increased significantly in women who watched more than two hours a day and stood at 69% more than women who watched less than an hour a day. In addition, women who watched more than two hours a day increased their risk of developing rectal cancer by 2.44 times more than women who watched less than an hour a day.

“These findings provide further and dramatic proof of the great importance of adopting a healthy and active lifestyle to reduce the risk of cancer,” the researchers wrote.

Click here to continue reading this article sourced from BreakingIsraelNews.com

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Eurordis launches Rare Barometer


EURORDIS, through its Rare Barometer programme, has launched a new survey on rare diseases/ rare cancers patients’ experience of treatment. The purpose is to highlight unmet treatment needs.

Yes, it is another survey…! However, the results of the survey can be very useful for the advocacy work we do in the field of rare cancers and would complement other survey’s results you may have carried out for your rare cancer.

We have a team of professional researchers, specialised in surveys, who shall be able to conduct a thorough analysis of the responses received.

The survey is available in 23 languages and is intended for patients, their family members and carers. All responses are anonymous and will be kept in secure storage only accessible to our research team.

The survey shall take about 10 minutes to complete: Click here to take the survey.

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Take the Interactive DiCE Symptom Checker


Digestive Cancers Europe has created an online interactive colorectal cancer symptom checker!

Using a traffic light system to pinpoint warning signs, this tool was created for European Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month 2019.

Click here to use and share the DiCE Symptom Checker.

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Cancer Patients Need Access to the Best Technology


Despite the recent advancements in biomedical technology and treatment therapies, cancer remains one of the leading causes of death world-wide. Patient organisations such as Digestive Cancers Europe want to change that by giving the patients themselves a louder voice in the fight against cancer. BioStock reached out to the Executive Director of the Digestive Cancers Europe, Stefan Gijssels, to ask him about the organisation’s mission and how early-stage products like IndiTreat from 2cureX can contribute to fulfilling that mission.

Read the interview with Stefan Gijssels here.

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Can Dogs Detect Cancer?


It might sound like something from a science fiction novel but there is now strong scientific evidence to show that our dogs can actually detect human cancers. This fantastic ability is now being honed by dog trainers and clinical researchers with the hope that this will enable cancers to be discovered in the early stages, meaning they can be more successfully treated.

Even before the scientific studies began in earnest there was an increasing number of anecdotal reports from owners that their dogs alerted them to their cancer. The dogs would begin displaying unusual behaviour around their owners because they were able to detect cancer through their sense of smell. At first, these reports were often poo-pooed as being flights of fancy but as the reports increased it meant that more official studies began being conducted to establish what truth there was behind these claims.

Dogs have a VERY good sense of smell

You are probably already aware that dogs have a truly amazing sense of smell. With 25 times as many smell receptors than us humans, their sense of smell is at least 10,000 to 100,000 times more sensitive than our own!

Whilst the human brain is largely controlled by the visual cortex (the outer layer of the cerebrum), a dog’s brain is governed mostly by their olfactory (smell) cortex. Their olfactory cortex is at least 40 times larger than ours.

It can be hard to wrap your head around just how powerful their sense of smell really is but, to give it some context, it is claimed that a dog can detect the smell of a single drop of blood in an Olympic sized swimming pool. This is why they are already used very successfully as part of search and rescue teams and as drug and bomb detection dogs for the police.

Click here to continue reading this article sourced from YourDogAdvisor.com

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How I defeated colon cancer: The real story of a survivor


Have you or someone close to you been diagnosed with cancer?

Are you preparing for a long hard fight?

It can be devastating news, hearing that you are suffering from cancer. The range of emotions you will feel at such a time will be wide and varied, but this sort of news is not the gloomy outlook it once was. In today’s world there are many ways to tackle cancer and inside the pages of this book you can learn things like:

- Using emotions and feelings in the fight
- Chemotherapy
- Surgery
- How to use diet to best effect
- Alternative treatments
- How to act and think during dark moments
- And much more…

Click here to read the book on Amazon.com

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DiCE Releases the CRC Screening Roadmap


In parallel to the White Paper on Colorectal Cancer Screening, we also present the Roadmap for Colorectal Cancer Screening. The first document is directed at policy-makers and highlights what needs to change in health policy to save hundreds of thousands of lives, the latter describes in a step-by-step approach how a colorectal cancer screening campaign should be set up. This approach is based on the experience of the three best practices in Europe: the Netherlands, Slovenia and the Basque region in Spain. All three examples have managed to achieve colorectal cancer screening participation rates between 62 and 72%, and at the same time significantly increasing the number of early stage diagnosis, resulting in better overall survival, and even reduction of the incidence (the number of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer), because so many polyps were detected in a pre-cancerous stage. The Basque country demonstrated that colorectal cancer screening is not only cost-effective, but over time even cost-saving.

The three successful screening programmes have some elements in common:

  • Involvement of all stakeholders from the start to create a fully integrated and inclusive plan
  • Learning from other countries to apply best practices and to avoid common mistakes
  • Ambitious, sustained and long term perspective with support of all political parties and solid investments
  • A solid combination of healthcare hardware (operational organisation, laboratories, hospital capacity) and software (psychology, sociology, …)
  • Good integration of databases, registries, analyses and communication
  • Pilot Projects to test the system
  • Training, education and certification
  • Investments in ideal capacity track of testing, colonoscopy and surgery

The best practices also show that the higher the participation rate of the population, the better the cost-effectiveness becomes.

Colorectal cancer is a disease that evolves very slowly, sometimes even as long ten years between colon polyps and a late stage tumour. The problem with colorectal cancer is that the symptoms can only be identified by the patient once the disease is well advanced. If we only rely on patient-reported symptoms, we are too late to offer patients a good chance of survival. That is why screening is so critical. In Europe, only 15% of patients are diagnosed at stage I, when they have a chance of survival of 90% and more. The best practices in our Roadmap demonstrate that they are able to increase to 48% of patients now diagnosed at stage I.

The Roadmap offers an initial blueprint on how to set up a colorectal cancer screening campaign. The best practices exist. There is no reason not to apply them.

Click here to read and download the Colorectal Cancer Roadmap.

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DiCE Releases the CRC Screening White Paper


This year DiCE has released the Colorectal Cancer Screening White Paper.

The White Paper highlights the fact that despite the commitment from all EU Ministers of Health in 2003, only three Member States (France, Ireland and Slovenia) have organised Formal Population-based Colorectal cancer screening programmes addressed to all citizens between 50 and 74 years old. The best outcomes were achieved in the Netherlands (citizens older than 55), Slovenia and the Basque country:

- Increase in early detection from 15% to 48% of the population
- Decrease in colorectal cancer mortality
- Overall cost saving in the healthcare system

If all Member States achieved the same results, the number of citizens detected with early stage cancer could be improved from 55,000 to 185,000, and therefore significantly increasing chances of survival. Every year. Stefan Gijssels, Executive Director comments: “There is no rational reason not to organise formal national screening campaigns. It saves lives and money. The major barrier we see is a political one. It takes a lot of effort and time to organise, and screening campaigns require a sustained effort. The financial savings in the healthcare budget may only be visible ten years after the start, but the upside in the number of lives saved should justify screening. As we have seen, the quality of the screening programme is critical to its success. Luckily, several Member States are starting now to have a more professional approach to screening. We can assist them if needed.”

Click here to read and download the White Paper.

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We Launched ECCAM 2019 in EU Parliament!


On Thursday 28th February 2019 Digestive Cancers Europe launched a campaign to promote colorectal cancer screening at the occasion of the start of European Colon Cancer Awareness Month (ECCAM). The event took place at the European Parliament and was hosted by MEP Lieve Wierinck (ALDE).

Click here to view the PRESS RELEASE

Building on the successful 2018 theme #Time4Change, this year ECCAM will be focusing on making people aware of the benefits of detecting colorectal cancer early by taking the screening test which Digestive Cancers Europe believes may save an additional 130,000 lives every year.

Every year, 370,000 citizens in the European Union get a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and 170,000 of them die. Patients who are detected early (Stage I), have a chance of survival of 90% as compared to only 10% when detected in stage IV. Despite the fact that colorectal cancer evolves slowly, over a period of eight to ten years, the majority of patients are still detected in the late stage III & IV.
This makes the case for early screening an easy one, especially because the treatment of early stage cancer is cheaper than late stage, and over 3 billion euro of savings could be generated in the healthcare system every year.

The campaign consists of three activities:
- #MyBest10Seconds - The launch of a Public Awareness Campaign on the importance of getting screened. This social media campaign focuses on the little effort it takes to get screened and the huge life-saving impact it may have. A video shows other small daily things that take up ten seconds of anybody’s time. In colorectal cancer screening, this little effort may save one’s life.
- A White Paper on Colorectal Cancer Screening in Europe – the paper comes with ten policy recommendations to improve the current situation in the European Union.
- A Roadmap for Colorectal Cancer Screening. The publication offers a step-by-step approach on how to organise colorectal cancer screening campaigns at national level, based on the good results of Slovenia, the Netherlands and the Basque region in Spain.

The Public Awareness Campaign will be launched through social media in Finland, France, Italy, Portugal, Slovakia and Spain. The video and social media campaign is addressed at citizens of 50 and older. Ads will appear in news feeds on Facebook and as ‘pre-roll’ on You Tube, aiming to reach over 1 million citizens. National Associations will further amplify the efforts locally.

The official campaign microsite can be found at www.mybest10seconds.com
The official campaign video 'My Best 10 Seconds' can be viewed and shared here.

Jola Gore-Booth, Executive Director comments: “We want to make people aware that they can have control over their own life. Many people are still hesitant to test themselves, yet it’s clear that everybody older than 50 should get screened. The effort is minor, and there are no downsides to it. The testing is easy, as is colonoscopy. There is really no reason to risk one’s life by not participating in screening programmes. Still too many people wait. That’s why our campaign is so important.”

The White Paper highlights the fact that despite the commitment from all EU Ministers of Health in 2003, only three Member States (France, Ireland and Slovenia) have organised Formal Population-based Colorectal cancer screening programmes addressed to all citizens between 50 and 74 years old. The best outcomes were achieved in the Netherlands (citizens older than 55), Slovenia and the Basque country:
- Increase in early detection from 15% to 48% of the population
- Decrease in colorectal cancer mortality
- Overall cost saving in the healthcare system

If all Member States achieved the same results, the number of citizens detected with early stage cancer could be improved from 55,000 to 185,000, and therefore significantly increasing chances of survival. Every year.

Stefan Gijssels, Executive Director comments: “There is no rational reason not to organise formal national screening campaigns. It saves lives and money. The major barrier we see is a political one. It takes a lot of effort and time to organise, and screening campaigns require a sustained effort. The financial savings in the healthcare budget may only be visible ten years after the start, but the upside in the number of lives saved should justify screening. As we have seen, the quality of the screening programme is critical to its success. Luckily, several Member States are starting now to have a more professional approach to screening. We can assist them if needed.”

Digestive Cancers Europe represents 40 National Associations in 30 European countries and is active in the areas of oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colon, rectum and rare cancers of the digestive tract. The Organisation collaborates with Pancreatic Cancer Europe.

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Digestive Cancers Europe
Scots House
Scots Lane
Salisbury
SP1 3TR
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 1722 333 587
info@digestivecancers.eu


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