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Can Dogs Detect Cancer?


It might sound like something from a science fiction novel but there is now strong scientific evidence to show that our dogs can actually detect human cancers. This fantastic ability is now being honed by dog trainers and clinical researchers with the hope that this will enable cancers to be discovered in the early stages, meaning they can be more successfully treated.

Even before the scientific studies began in earnest there was an increasing number of anecdotal reports from owners that their dogs alerted them to their cancer. The dogs would begin displaying unusual behaviour around their owners because they were able to detect cancer through their sense of smell. At first, these reports were often poo-pooed as being flights of fancy but as the reports increased it meant that more official studies began being conducted to establish what truth there was behind these claims.

Dogs have a VERY good sense of smell

You are probably already aware that dogs have a truly amazing sense of smell. With 25 times as many smell receptors than us humans, their sense of smell is at least 10,000 to 100,000 times more sensitive than our own!

Whilst the human brain is largely controlled by the visual cortex (the outer layer of the cerebrum), a dog’s brain is governed mostly by their olfactory (smell) cortex. Their olfactory cortex is at least 40 times larger than ours.

It can be hard to wrap your head around just how powerful their sense of smell really is but, to give it some context, it is claimed that a dog can detect the smell of a single drop of blood in an Olympic sized swimming pool. This is why they are already used very successfully as part of search and rescue teams and as drug and bomb detection dogs for the police.

Click here to continue reading this article sourced from YourDogAdvisor.com

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How I defeated colon cancer: The real story of a survivor


Have you or someone close to you been diagnosed with cancer?

Are you preparing for a long hard fight?

It can be devastating news, hearing that you are suffering from cancer. The range of emotions you will feel at such a time will be wide and varied, but this sort of news is not the gloomy outlook it once was. In today’s world there are many ways to tackle cancer and inside the pages of this book you can learn things like:

- Using emotions and feelings in the fight
- Chemotherapy
- Surgery
- How to use diet to best effect
- Alternative treatments
- How to act and think during dark moments
- And much more…

Click here to read the book on Amazon.com

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Doctor, I've been on the internet again


I sat grim-faced in the examining room, waiting for my doctor so I could tell her my bad news.

"What's wrong?" my doctor, Milissa Cooper, asked, pulling a stool up close so we were knee-to-knee.

"I have colon cancer," I told her, as gently as I could. I won't go into the gory details, but I had all the symptoms.

"And how do you know this?" she asked.

"WebMD.com," I said matter-of-factly.

Did she just roll her eyes at me? I thought she'd be devastated.

I apparently wasn't the first patient she'd seen who had come up with an alarming self-diagnosis on the Internet. I probably wasn't even the first one she'd seen that day.

Over the past 15 years, Dr. Cooper has seen an increase in patients who come in with reams of research they have pulled off the Internet.

She remembers what it was like in medical school, where students diagnosed themselves with the diseases they studied. She admires her patients' desire for knowledge and takes their concerns seriously but worries they cause themselves undue anxiety.

OK, so it's more likely I have gastroenteritis or a bug, but I was imagining me with a colostomy bag instead of picking up a case of Activia.

The official term for this is “cyberchondria,” coined in 2000 to describe otherwise rational Internet users tapping out symptoms and latching on to the worst possible diagnosis.

Every headache is a potential aneurysm. Thirsty? I'm diabetic.

Dr. Cooper gave me probiotics, which helped, and ran some tests (all negative). She suggested I lay off WebMD.

Here are the new rules: I can use the Internet to clarify what my doctor tells me and to help me ask smart questions, but I can't make my own diagnosis.

At least not until I finish medical school.

Click here to read the original article sourced from EU AZ Central.

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We Support World Cancer Day 2019!


4th February 2019 is World Cancer Day

Each year on 4 February, World Cancer Day empowers all of us across the world to show support, raise our collective voice, take personal action and press our governments to do more. World Cancer Day is the only day on the global health calendar where we can all unite and rally under the one banner of cancer in a positive and inspiring way.

Click here to find out more about WCD, download information sheets and share your support!

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Surgical Practices May Explain Survival Differences


Poor colorectal cancer survival rates in some countries could be due to lower rates of surgical resection in those areas, particularly among elderly patients, according to findings from a retrospective, tumor-registry study published in The Lancet Oncology.1 Surgical techniques did not appear to correlate with survival rates in the comparative study of treatment patterns and patient outcomes in England, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden.

“Survival from colon cancer and rectal cancer in England and colon cancer in Denmark was lower than in Norway and Sweden,” the authors reported. “Survival paralleled the relative provision of resectional surgery in these countries. Differences in patient selection for surgery, especially in patients older than 75 years or individuals with advanced disease, might partly explain these differences in international colorectal cancer survival.”

Click here to read the full article sourced from Cancer Therapy Advisor.

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EU Health Summit 2018


As we head towards the European Parliament elections in 2019, healthcare systems and citizens across Europe are facing unprecedented challenges arising from an ageing population, and increased prevalence of chronic diseases. At the same time, rapid scientific developments are leading us into a new era of innovation.

What is the role of the European Union in helping European health systems to make the most of these opportunities for the benefit of citizens and patients, while following a sustainable path?

How can different sectors converge to help ensuring a healthy future for Europe?

Join the first ever multi-stakeholder summit organised by 28 organisations from within and across the health community to discuss how Europe could develop and take the lead in areas such as research and innovation, health data and digital health, healthcare organisation and financing, as well as health in all policies.

The summit will take place on 29 November at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Brussels. To register, click here. For more information, please visit our website: www.euhealthsummit.eu

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A remarkable insight into the cancer journey of Barbara Moss


Barbara Moss speaks to Roshaine Wijayatunga, Senior Editor Oncology at the 2018 European Society for Medical Oncology World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer (ESMO GI; Barcelona).

Barbara Moss is a Patient Ambassador for EuropaColon and Bowel Cancer UK. At the age of 52, in 2006, Barbara was diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer of the colon, spread to the liver and was told she had 3–5 months to live! Barbara is now an active campaigner and an active member of several organizations in the UK and Europe. Her main wish is for patients to be able to access the medicine that they need, to have choices clearly explained and to be treated personally.

Click here to read the full article.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

Published online: 19 October 2018


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Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month is here


November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month - Turn it purple to show your support and raise awareness for this hard to fight cancer.

Pancreatic cancer is the toughest cancer to diagnose, treat and survive. 1 in 4 people do not survive for a month. 3 in 4 will not survive for a year.

Find out more about how you can support on the links below:

https://www.pancreaticcancereurope.eu
http://www.worldpancreaticcancerday.org

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Digestive Cancers Europe
Scots House
Scots Lane
Salisbury
SP1 3TR
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 1722 333 587
info@digestivecancers.eu


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