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Diets 'devoid of vegetable matter' may cause colon cancer

Published on 05 September 2018  | Download | back to previous

 (click to view the video)A new study emphasizes the importance to gut health of eating plenty of vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, and kale.

Researchers from the Francis Crick Institute in London, United Kingdom, found that keeping mice on a diet rich in a compound known as indole-3-carbinol (I3C) — which comes from such vegetables — prevented the animals' intestines from becoming inflamed and developing colon cancer.

They report the study in a paper now published in the journal Immunity.

"Seeing the profound effect," says study senior author Dr. Brigitta Stockinger, a group leader at the Francis Crick Institute, "of diet on gut inflammation and colon cancer was very striking."

Our digestive system produces I3C when we eat vegetables from a "large and diverse group" of plants known as brassicas.

Brassicas include, but are not limited to: broccoli, cabbage, collards, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, swede, turnip, bok choi, and mizuna.

Colon cancer typically starts as a growth, or polyp, in the lining of the colon or large intestine. It can take many years for the cancer to develop from a polyp and not all polyps become cancerous.

Cancer of the colon or rectum is the third most commonly diagnosed in both women and men in the United States, not counting skin cancer.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimate that there will be 97,220 new cases of diagnosed colon cancer in the U.S. in 2018.

Click here to continue reading this article from Medical News Today. 


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